Staten Island – Fact or Fiction: The Underground Railroad – A free event at the Recital Hall at the CSI Center for the Arts

Given that the founders of the Unitarian Church of Staten Island were abolitionists, we thought this event would be of interest to members and friends of UCSI.

Abolitionists

A panel of community historians and academics will discuss: Abolitionists in New York, Underground Railroad activity, and did it occur on Staten Island?  How do historians appraise primary sources and assert discoveries?  Does oral history tell stories that go untold?  Why assiduous research is the key to discovery.

Meet the panelists:

Moderator: Professor Catherine Lavender, Ph.D, Director of the American Studies Program, CUNY, College of Staten Island.
Discussion/Panelists include:
• Professor Robert Fanuzzi, Ph.D, St. John’s College of Arts and Sciences, The Anti-slavery Movement.
• Debbie-Ann Paige, MA Independent Scholar
• Professor Howard Wiener, Ph.D, CSI Department of History, CUNY, College of Staten Island
• Professor Calvin Holder, Ph.D, Director of the African American Studies Program, CUNY, College of Staten Island
• Professor John Dixon, Ph.D CSI Department of History, CUNY, College of Staten Island

This program is FREE and open to the Public and has been made possible in collaboration with the Department of History, College of Staten Island/City University of New York with financial support from Con Edison, New York Council for the Humanities, and the NYC Department of Cultural Affairs.

For more information contact Cara Dellatte at CDellatte@StatenIslandMuseum.org.

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One response to “Staten Island – Fact or Fiction: The Underground Railroad – A free event at the Recital Hall at the CSI Center for the Arts

  1. Please do join us — we are very interested in community participation in this event! Also, we look forward to hearing from members of the SI community about their interest in future events about the history of Staten Island! Personally, I’d love to organize an event around the history of the Unitarian Church, especially its leadership in reform and civil rights, including the woman’s movement of the 19th Century.

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